Jason Prado
Jason is from Ripon, CA, a small town in the Central Valley that is predominately known for growing almonds. Growing up, Jason was fascinated by the almond orchards, some of which lay in his own backyard. Though they are mostly understood as an agricultural entity, Jason also saw how they provide pseudo-public spaces to gather and play, create subtle topography through the presence of waterways, track seasonal and climatic changes, and provide emotional relief with yearly blooms. Jason experienced these orchards as measured and designed spaces that give Ripon a sense of pride and cultural identity. However, as new developments grew up in the town, the almond orchards began to disappear. This difficult change instilled in Jason an understanding of the power of landscape at a cultural and experiential level.

Jason received his bachelor’s degree in Environmental Studies from the University of California Santa Barbara. He later earned a Master of Landscape Architecture from UC Berkeley. He was then awarded the Geraldine Knight Scott Travel Fellowship, to spend two months traveling and conducting research concerning the landscape history of ancient civilizations in Mexico and Peru. Visiting ruins both world-famous and lesser-known, Jason documented the how the development of ancient cities—as indigenous peoples in the region transitioned from temporary to permanent settlements—affected the form of the landscape and had cascading influences on modern urban spaces. While in graduate school, Jason interned at HOK and Petersen Studio, both located in San Francisco. Prior to that, he worked as a research assistant at the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore and the San Diego Research Foundation, where he practiced habitat restoration. Outside of work, Jason loves to spend time outdoors—whether with friends, going to shows, doing yoga, biking, or visiting parks and gardens.

Jason joined MVVA in 2017.

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